Novak Djokovic practising on court in Melbourne - AFP
 
Novak Djokovic practising on court in Melbourne - AFP

Novak Djokovic is being investigated over whether he falsely stated he had not travelled and would not do so in the two weeks prior to his flight to Australia.

In the latest twist in the Djokovic deportation furore, questions have been raised about the Australian Travel Declaration (ATD) he told border officials had been completed by his agent after social media posts indicated he had travelled from Serbia to Spain between Christmas and new year before flying to Melbourne on January 4 via Dubai.

 
 

Whoever filled out the form ticked ‘No’ to the question: “Have you travelled, or will you travel, in the 14 days prior to your flight to Australia? Giving false or misleading information is a serious offence. You may also be liable to a civil penalty for giving false or misleading information.”

In his sworn affidavit to the court hearing which overturned the decision to deport him from the country, Djokovic said he had “authorised” his agent to submit his ATD “on or about 1 January”.

 
Shark-free, single-ga
Djokovic's Australia Travel Declaration form, which was released by the federal court on Monday
 
Djokovic's Australia Travel Declaration form, which was released by the federal court on Monday

Social media posts indicate Djokovic had been in Belgrade on Christmas Day – 11 days before he arrived in Australia – but in Spain on New Year’s Eve.

Djokovic owns a luxury property in Marbella, where he spends much of his downtime during the year.

Telegraph Sport has approached representatives for Djokovic for comment.

Djokovic visits the Puente Romano Tennis Club in Marbella - SOTOTENNIS ACADEMY
 
Djokovic visits the Puente Romano Tennis Club in Marbella - SOTOTENNIS ACADEMY

Djokovic, 34, told immigration officers that his agent had completed the ATD for him, before submitting it to Tennis Australia in order to gain a medical exemption.

However, the immigration officer who on Jan 6 filed the notice of intention to cancel Djokovic’s visa, said the cancellation was made “based on information the visa holder provided”.

Sudhir R, who submitted the notice, said that fact led to them placing “significant weight” in favour of cancelling Djokovic’s visa.

The officer wrote: “The visa holder stated that Tennis Australia facilitated his medical exemption from Covid-19 vaccination requirement and completed the Australia Travel Declaration on his behalf.

“I consider that Tennis Australia would have facilitated his medical exemption and Australian Travel Declaration based on information the visa holder provided to them.

“As such, I don’t consider these constitute extenuating circumstances beyond the visa holder's control. Based on the above, I apply significant weight in favour of visa cancellation for this factor.”

Djokovic and his family have already refused to explain why the world No1 repeatedly appeared in public while positive for coronavirus.

A press conference held by Djokovic’s brother, mother, father and uncle in Belgrade was abruptly ended on Monday when they were asked about his attendance at events in the days following the Dec 16 positive.

Australia’s immigration minister, Alex Hawke, was still deciding on Tuesday whether to throw the Serb out of the country, with a verdict not expected before Wednesday local time at the earliest.